Mint

Mint has long become synonymous with freshness, and cleanliness. From its cool tingle running down your throat as you inhale its deep essence, to its fresh blast as you exhale it into the world, leaving the air around you seeming oddly cleaner. But where did this all start? How did man come to utilize this icy fresh gift from earth?

Mint has long become synonymous with freshness, and cleanliness. From its cool tingle running down your throat as you inhale its deep essence, to its fresh blast as you exhale it into the world, leaving the air around you seeming oddly cleaner. But where did this all start? How did man come to utilize this icy fresh gift from earth?

Mint originated in the Asian, and Mediterranean region. One of the first and most prominent bastion of civilization the ancient Greeks have been evident to using this herb. And in fact the name mint comes from ancient Greek, and is derived from the Greek Naiad(A type of female spirit that resides over bodies of fresh water) Minthe. The Greeks aptly named the plant, as it is grown near pools of water, hungrily turning life’s liquid into fragrant green leaves.

Not content with just Greek mythology, there are also references to the herb in the bible (Matthew 23). The plant was so valued that they used it to pay taxes. You can of course, still use it to pay it to pay taxes… Except now you have to sell the mint first.

In modern times mint has managed to be able to be grown far from its origins, and is grown on almost all continents, the exception being the freezing tundra of the Antarctic. There are varieties of the plant that now grow in The Americas, as well as Africa.

There estimated to be between 13 – 18 varieties of the species. The most common variety of mints used is spearmint, and peppermint. The spearmint is native to most of Europe, and Asia, and is actually the most commonly used of all the mints. Peppermint is actually a hybrid, and crosses the watermint, with the spearmint; the plant is indigenous to Europe, and the Middle East. The Peppermint has a strong menthol content, which gives it that strong toothpaste/chewing gum flavour, and is ideal for creating mint tea.

From mans first discovery of mint, it was already used as aromatherapy. From usage as a room deodorizer, to using it in baths, and funeral rites, mints signature sent quickly became a favourite.

Not content with just its smell mint was also used in cooking to enhance, and improved drinks, and food. As the sands of time flew by, and mint was studied further, it was found that it had many more uses. Consumption was used in traditional medicine to help digestion, and is now being studied for its ability to treat irritable bowel syndrome.

The journey of this plant is far from over with new studies being done on its various uses. Its ubiquity in everything from soaps, to sauces show make it one of the most useful and well loved herbs around.

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2 Comments

    • Hello Ressa,
      Our essential oils are 100% natural however since we are a skincare company we cannot claim this, However some chefs use our essential oils in Chocolate making etc. When consuming essential oils you have to be very carefull since some can be harmfull to your health. If you have any questions please feel free to email us at info@utamaspicebali.com

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